• REM Sleep: What It Is And Why It's Great For Dreaming!

    What is REM sleep exactly and what does it have to do with lucid dreaming? Well today I decided to make a short video to explain exactly what rem and non-rem sleep cycles are, how they work and what they have to do with lucid dreaming! So ‘REM’ stands for ‘Rapid Eye Movement’ because whilst we are in REM sleep our eyes will move rapidly. And each night we go in and out of these ‘REM’ sleep cycles around 4-5 times with the REM cycles towards the beginning of your sleep being shorter and then progressively getting longer and longer throughout the night. In total we experience around 90 – 120 minutes of REM sleep every night. And what’s particularly interesting about REM sleep is that whilst in these REM cycles we experience two very distinct things: The first is that we dream. During the ...

    published: 26 Oct 2014
  • Eye movements in sleep ‘change scenes’ of dreams

    Researchers cite first scientific evidence that eye movements during REM sleep reflect brain activity patterns associated with new images. A new Israeli-led study based on rare neuronal data offers the first scientific evidence of the link between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep- the period in which we experience vivid dreams- dream images, and accelerated brain activity. According to the study, when we move our eyes in REM sleep specific brain regions show sudden surges of activity that resemble the pattern that occurs when we see new images when awake. The scientists suggest that these flickering eye movements during REM sleep are responsible for resetting our dream “snapshots” or “changing the scene” in our dreams. “The electrical brain activity during rapid eye movements in sleep wer...

    published: 14 Aug 2015
  • Stages of Sleep, REM Sleep & Dreaming

    This video was made for PS263 Biopsychology at Wilfrid Laurier University. By Shraddha Patel Professor: Dr. P. Mallet

    published: 25 Jul 2016
  • Maria in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep

    She was asleep in her tent without anything to drink, yet it was so easy to open her eyes and her mouth when she was dreaming. Look at the position of her eyes!

    published: 19 Feb 2013
  • cute kitty cat sleeping dreaming rem eye movements twitches

    http://stores.ebay.com/Vintage-Video-Games-Galore-And-More

    published: 03 Jul 2015
  • How to Remember Dreams

    Nutella Bread Recipe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eHPkpCGdEY Watch more Dreams & Dream Interpretation videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/395038-How-to-Remember-Dreams Adventured through the Amazon? Met a dashing lad? Rode on a unicorn? Dreams like these deserve to be remembered, so follow these tips on better dream recall and remember your dreams more often. Make your dream recall better so they don't fade away. Step 1: Keep a journal Keep a journal and a pen right next to your bed at all times. Writing down your dream first thing in the morning will help with remembering details. Step 2: Wake slowly Wake up slowly in the morning. Take a few extra minutes under the covers to retell your dream in your head. Once you've got an internal grasp on the dream, write it down before ge...

    published: 21 Jul 2010
  • My dog dreaming and his creepy eye movements.

    So my dog has very intense dreams, to the point of having his eyes open. It's fairly creepy.

    published: 12 Sep 2012
  • White Dreams Rapid Eye Movement Sequence

    published: 28 Mar 2010
  • Baby having rapid eye movement (REM) sleep

    REM (rapid eye movement) and non-REM are the two types of sleep. REM sleep is very light. A baby may twitch, smile, or even coo during REM sleep; it's also the stage where dreaming occurs. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a stage of sleep characterized by the rapid and random movement of the eyes. Rapid eye movement sleep is classified into two categories: tonic and phasic. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a stage of sleep characterized by the rapid and random movement of the eyes. Rapid eye movement sleep is classified into two categories: tonic and phasic. It was identified and defined by Nathaniel Kleitman and his student Eugene Aserinsky in 1953. Criteria for REM sleep includes rapid eye movement, low muscle tone and a rapid, low-voltage EEG; these features are easily discernible in...

    published: 16 Jul 2008
  • Chuy and his creepy eye movements while dreaming

    9-2-15

    published: 02 Sep 2015
  • Deep Dreaming Sleep with REM

    Download footage link:http://videohive.net/item/deep-dreaming-sleep-with-rem/5689239?WT.ac=solid_search_item&WT.seg_1=solid_search_item&WT.z_author=Christian_Fletcher During a deep sleep, while dreaming deep, the REM phenomenon occurs. Suitable for experimental videos, sleep and night dreaming themes. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a normal stage of sleep characterized by the rapid and random movement of the eyes. Subjects vividly recalled dreams mostly occur during REM sleep.

    published: 02 Mar 2014
  • To Sleep, Perchance to Dream - Crash Course Psychology #9

    You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. Why do we sleep? Well... that's a tricky question. More easily answered is the question,"How do we sleep?" In this episode of Crash Course Psychology, Hank discusses some of the ways our brain functions when sleeping and how it can malfunction as well. -- Table of Contents Four Stages of Sleep 02:38 Why We Dream 04:28 Information Processing 08:13 Physiological Function 08:31 Cognitive Development 08:52 Neural Activity Models 09:04 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...

    published: 31 Mar 2014
  • Space Travel & Dream Stabilization - [What to do in a Lucid Dream - #5]

    Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/Emsp64 Watch all episodes of: “What to do in a Lucid Dream”: Episode 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUJZ7F-Ms_g Episode 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJU-Vh4uRq4 Episode 3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_g15spvAnUU Episode 4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpP34GbK-So Episode 5 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32sGFle9zUk Follow me on: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/lucidlayla/?fref=ts Twitter https://twitter.com/LucidLayla Instagram https://www.instagram.com/lucid_layla/ Please don’t forget to subscribe, share & comment. Let me know about your experiences so we can start a conversation! I reply to every comment or question -------------- Other associated phenomena REM sleep. EEG highlighted by red box. Eye movements highlighted by ...

    published: 26 Jun 2015
  • Dreams and rapid eye movement: BBC World News 'Global' 12-08-2015

    Live discussion on 12th August 2015 about a the first scientific study to record from individual brain cells during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep in humans - the phase of sleep when we dream. Featuring science reporter Jonathan Webb and BBC World News presenter Matthew Amroliwala. Read more about the story here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-33860994

    published: 18 Dec 2015
  • Neuroscience - Sleep Cycle EEG

    In this video, I will draw the EEG waveforms of our patient, Bob, going through the different stages of sleep going chronologically from waking life to deep sleep to dreaming. First, Bob starts the process of going to bed by brushing his teeth. Right now, his eyes are open and he has active mental concentration on his task. His brain is busy, which is reflected by the beta waves of the EEG waveform. Beta waves have the highest frequency (14 – 30 Hz) and the lowest amplitude which represent the organized chaos inside a busy brain. Next, Bob lies down to sleep. He closes his eyes and his brain transitions into the alpha wave pattern. No longer processing visual information, the brain slows down which is reflected by the 9 – 13 Hz alpha waves. Now, Bob has fallen asleep and enters into stage...

    published: 17 Jul 2016
  • Rapid Eye Movement (REM) in Cats

    What do cats dream about??!!!! It is very likely that they are reliving an experience they had in their wild imagination - dream. Cats do dream. There is scientific evidence that cat's brain can formulate dreams during sleep. In humans, there are 5 stages of sleep where the fifth stage, AKA REM (rapid eye movement) is where dreams occur.Oct 14, 2009

    published: 02 Nov 2016
REM Sleep: What It Is And Why It's Great For Dreaming!

REM Sleep: What It Is And Why It's Great For Dreaming!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:14
  • Updated: 26 Oct 2014
  • views: 70731
videos
What is REM sleep exactly and what does it have to do with lucid dreaming? Well today I decided to make a short video to explain exactly what rem and non-rem sleep cycles are, how they work and what they have to do with lucid dreaming! So ‘REM’ stands for ‘Rapid Eye Movement’ because whilst we are in REM sleep our eyes will move rapidly. And each night we go in and out of these ‘REM’ sleep cycles around 4-5 times with the REM cycles towards the beginning of your sleep being shorter and then progressively getting longer and longer throughout the night. In total we experience around 90 – 120 minutes of REM sleep every night. And what’s particularly interesting about REM sleep is that whilst in these REM cycles we experience two very distinct things: The first is that we dream. During the REM cycle our brainwaves become massively heightened and polysomnograms even show that our brain activity during REM cycles are similar to those the same activity that we would find when we are awake. And as a result we experience our most vivid dreams during this portion of sleep. The second thing that we go through whilst in REM sleep is something called ‘sleep paralysis’ which means that our bodies are unable to move whilst we are asleep. And the reason we experience ‘sleep paralysis’ whilst we are in REM sleep is so that we don’t do something dangerous or stupid in real life such as going to try to jump off a balcony and fly in our real life when we go to do it in our dreams. Generally during REM sleep people become a lot harder to ‘wake up’ but if they do they will be much more likely to remember every detail of the vivid dream that they just had. Furthermore REM is also the stage in which we can ‘lucid dream’ and take control over our dreams. You can learn more about REM sleep here: http://www.iloveluciddreaming.com/rem-sleep/ Learn to lucid dream in a few easy steps: http://www.iloveluciddreaming.com/guide/
https://wn.com/Rem_Sleep_What_It_Is_And_Why_It's_Great_For_Dreaming
Eye movements in sleep ‘change scenes’ of dreams

Eye movements in sleep ‘change scenes’ of dreams

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:47
  • Updated: 14 Aug 2015
  • views: 237
videos
Researchers cite first scientific evidence that eye movements during REM sleep reflect brain activity patterns associated with new images. A new Israeli-led study based on rare neuronal data offers the first scientific evidence of the link between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep- the period in which we experience vivid dreams- dream images, and accelerated brain activity. According to the study, when we move our eyes in REM sleep specific brain regions show sudden surges of activity that resemble the pattern that occurs when we see new images when awake. The scientists suggest that these flickering eye movements during REM sleep are responsible for resetting our dream “snapshots” or “changing the scene” in our dreams. “The electrical brain activity during rapid eye movements in sleep were highly similar to those occurring when people were presented with new images,” said by Dr. Yuval Nir of Tel Aviv University’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, who led the study. “Many neurons — including those in the hippocampus — showed a sudden burst of activity shortly after eye movements in sleep, typically observed when these cells are ‘busy’ processing new images.” “The research findings suggest that rapid eye movements represent the moment the brain encounters a new image in a dream, similar to the brain activity exhibited when one encounters visual images while awake,” said TAU’s Prof. Itzhak Fried, also of UCLA and Tel Aviv Medical Center. http://www.israel21c.org/eye-movements-in-sleep-change-scenes-of-dreams/
https://wn.com/Eye_Movements_In_Sleep_‘Change_Scenes’_Of_Dreams
Stages of Sleep, REM Sleep & Dreaming

Stages of Sleep, REM Sleep & Dreaming

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:16
  • Updated: 25 Jul 2016
  • views: 1321
videos https://wn.com/Stages_Of_Sleep,_Rem_Sleep_Dreaming
Maria in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep

Maria in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:39
  • Updated: 19 Feb 2013
  • views: 192454
videos
She was asleep in her tent without anything to drink, yet it was so easy to open her eyes and her mouth when she was dreaming. Look at the position of her eyes!
https://wn.com/Maria_In_Rapid_Eye_Movement_(Rem)_Sleep
cute kitty cat sleeping dreaming rem eye movements twitches

cute kitty cat sleeping dreaming rem eye movements twitches

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:01
  • Updated: 03 Jul 2015
  • views: 228
videos
http://stores.ebay.com/Vintage-Video-Games-Galore-And-More
https://wn.com/Cute_Kitty_Cat_Sleeping_Dreaming_Rem_Eye_Movements_Twitches
How to Remember Dreams

How to Remember Dreams

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:48
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2010
  • views: 366151
videos
Nutella Bread Recipe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eHPkpCGdEY Watch more Dreams & Dream Interpretation videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/395038-How-to-Remember-Dreams Adventured through the Amazon? Met a dashing lad? Rode on a unicorn? Dreams like these deserve to be remembered, so follow these tips on better dream recall and remember your dreams more often. Make your dream recall better so they don't fade away. Step 1: Keep a journal Keep a journal and a pen right next to your bed at all times. Writing down your dream first thing in the morning will help with remembering details. Step 2: Wake slowly Wake up slowly in the morning. Take a few extra minutes under the covers to retell your dream in your head. Once you've got an internal grasp on the dream, write it down before getting out of bed. Tip Those peaceful moments between sleeping and waking are called the hypnagogic state. This can be a good time to remember dreams and take time to relieve stress. Step 3: [Sleep consistent] Maintain consistent sleep habits, including going to bed and waking at the same times each day, keeping snacks light before bed, avoiding caffeine and alcohol before bed, and sleeping on a comfortable mattress. Step 4: [Talk about your dreams] Talk to your friends and family about your dreams. Talking about memories can help conjure up details you may have forgotten and help with the interpretation of symbols that seemed beyond you. Step 5: Draw your dreams Draw pictures that you see in your dreams in your journal if drawing pictures is more helpful than describing them in writing. And remember to date your journal entries. Before you know it, you'll have a fabulous collection of dream memories. Did You Know? In 1953, researchers discovered that rapid eye movements, or REM, during sleep often signaled that a person was dreaming. They found that about an hour after subjects fell asleep, the subject experienced rapid eye movement and changes in brain waves.
https://wn.com/How_To_Remember_Dreams
My dog dreaming and his creepy eye movements.

My dog dreaming and his creepy eye movements.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:50
  • Updated: 12 Sep 2012
  • views: 228
videos
So my dog has very intense dreams, to the point of having his eyes open. It's fairly creepy.
https://wn.com/My_Dog_Dreaming_And_His_Creepy_Eye_Movements.
White Dreams Rapid Eye Movement Sequence

White Dreams Rapid Eye Movement Sequence

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:23
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2010
  • views: 56
videos
https://wn.com/White_Dreams_Rapid_Eye_Movement_Sequence
Baby having rapid eye movement (REM) sleep

Baby having rapid eye movement (REM) sleep

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:30
  • Updated: 16 Jul 2008
  • views: 62082
videos
REM (rapid eye movement) and non-REM are the two types of sleep. REM sleep is very light. A baby may twitch, smile, or even coo during REM sleep; it's also the stage where dreaming occurs. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a stage of sleep characterized by the rapid and random movement of the eyes. Rapid eye movement sleep is classified into two categories: tonic and phasic. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a stage of sleep characterized by the rapid and random movement of the eyes. Rapid eye movement sleep is classified into two categories: tonic and phasic. It was identified and defined by Nathaniel Kleitman and his student Eugene Aserinsky in 1953. Criteria for REM sleep includes rapid eye movement, low muscle tone and a rapid, low-voltage EEG; these features are easily discernible in a polysomnogram, the sleep study typically done for patients with suspected sleep disorders. REM sleep typically occupies 20–25% of total sleep, about 90–120 minutes of a night's sleep. The first REM sleep period occurs 90-120 min after sleep onset with the last REM period usually being the longest and normally occurs close to morning.During a night of sleep, one usually experiences about four or five periods of REM sleep; they are quite short at the beginning of the night and longer toward the end. Many animals and some people tend to wake, or experience a period of very light sleep, for a short time immediately after a bout of REM. The relative amount of REM sleep varies considerably with age. A newborn baby spends more than 80% of total sleep time in REM. During REM, the activity of the brain's neurons is quite similar to that during waking hours; for this reason, the REM-sleep stage may be called paradoxical sleep. REM sleep is physiologically different from the other phases of sleep, which are collectively referred to as non-REM sleep (NREM sleep). Subjects' vividly recalled dreams mostly occur during REM sleep.
https://wn.com/Baby_Having_Rapid_Eye_Movement_(Rem)_Sleep
Chuy and his creepy eye movements while dreaming

Chuy and his creepy eye movements while dreaming

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:29
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2015
  • views: 3
videos
9-2-15
https://wn.com/Chuy_And_His_Creepy_Eye_Movements_While_Dreaming
Deep Dreaming Sleep with REM

Deep Dreaming Sleep with REM

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:15
  • Updated: 02 Mar 2014
  • views: 4800
videos
Download footage link:http://videohive.net/item/deep-dreaming-sleep-with-rem/5689239?WT.ac=solid_search_item&WT.seg_1=solid_search_item&WT.z_author=Christian_Fletcher During a deep sleep, while dreaming deep, the REM phenomenon occurs. Suitable for experimental videos, sleep and night dreaming themes. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a normal stage of sleep characterized by the rapid and random movement of the eyes. Subjects vividly recalled dreams mostly occur during REM sleep.
https://wn.com/Deep_Dreaming_Sleep_With_Rem
To Sleep, Perchance to Dream - Crash Course Psychology #9

To Sleep, Perchance to Dream - Crash Course Psychology #9

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:41
  • Updated: 31 Mar 2014
  • views: 1218732
videos
You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. Why do we sleep? Well... that's a tricky question. More easily answered is the question,"How do we sleep?" In this episode of Crash Course Psychology, Hank discusses some of the ways our brain functions when sleeping and how it can malfunction as well. -- Table of Contents Four Stages of Sleep 02:38 Why We Dream 04:28 Information Processing 08:13 Physiological Function 08:31 Cognitive Development 08:52 Neural Activity Models 09:04 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
https://wn.com/To_Sleep,_Perchance_To_Dream_Crash_Course_Psychology_9
Space Travel & Dream Stabilization - [What to do in a Lucid Dream - #5]

Space Travel & Dream Stabilization - [What to do in a Lucid Dream - #5]

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:58
  • Updated: 26 Jun 2015
  • views: 1538
videos
Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/Emsp64 Watch all episodes of: “What to do in a Lucid Dream”: Episode 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUJZ7F-Ms_g Episode 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJU-Vh4uRq4 Episode 3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_g15spvAnUU Episode 4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpP34GbK-So Episode 5 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32sGFle9zUk Follow me on: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/lucidlayla/?fref=ts Twitter https://twitter.com/LucidLayla Instagram https://www.instagram.com/lucid_layla/ Please don’t forget to subscribe, share & comment. Let me know about your experiences so we can start a conversation! I reply to every comment or question -------------- Other associated phenomena REM sleep. EEG highlighted by red box. Eye movements highlighted by red line. Rapid eye movement (REM)[edit] Main article: Rapid eye movement sleep When a person is dreaming, the eyes shift rapidly. Scientific research has found that these eye movements may correspond to the direction the dreamer "looks" at in the dreamscape. This has enabled trained lucid dreamers to communicate with researchers while dreaming by using eye movement signals.[43] False awakening Main article: False awakening In a false awakening, one dreams of having awoken. The room the dreamer falsely awakens in is often similar to the room he/she fell asleep in. If the person was lucid, they often believe that they are no longer dreaming and begin their morning routine. The dreamer remains naive to the dream either until they realize they haven't actually woken up or until they wake up again (whether false or real). Sleep paralysis Main article: Sleep paralysis During sleep the body paralyzes itself as a protection mechanism to prevent the movements that occur in the dream from causing the physical body to move. However, this mechanism can be triggered before, during, or after normal sleep while the brain awakens. This can lead to a state where the awakened sleeper feels paralyzed. Hypnagogic hallucination may occur in this state, especially auditory ones. Effects of sleep paralysis include heaviness or inability to move the muscles, rushing or pulsating noises, and brief hypnogogic or hypnopompic imagery. Out-of-body experience Main article: Out-of-body experience An out-of-body experience (OBE or sometimes OOBE) is an experience that typically involves a sensation of floating outside of one's body and, in some cases, perceiving one's physical body from a place outside one's body (autoscopy). About one in ten people claim to have had an out-of-body experience at some time in their lives.[63] Scientists are learning about the phenomenon.[64] Some work by neurologists suggests that such experiences are generated by the same brain mechanisms that cause lucid dreams.[65] Despite some similarities in their phenomenology and induction methods, EEG studies do not suggest an equivalence between OBEs and lucid dreams. Lucidity is strongly associated with stage 1 REM sleep but OBEs are far less consistent, producing EEG traces that can variously resemble stage 3 sleep, a waking, eyes-closed state or other uncategorized states. [66] However, while this may suggest that perceived OBEs are a type of lucid dream which takes place in a dream environment that mimics the actual environment of the dreamer, this falls short of supporting the idea that some conscious form of the dreamer actually leaves the body and perceives their external environment while still in a sleeping state.
https://wn.com/Space_Travel_Dream_Stabilization_What_To_Do_In_A_Lucid_Dream_5
Dreams and rapid eye movement: BBC World News 'Global' 12-08-2015

Dreams and rapid eye movement: BBC World News 'Global' 12-08-2015

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:08
  • Updated: 18 Dec 2015
  • views: 279
videos
Live discussion on 12th August 2015 about a the first scientific study to record from individual brain cells during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep in humans - the phase of sleep when we dream. Featuring science reporter Jonathan Webb and BBC World News presenter Matthew Amroliwala. Read more about the story here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-33860994
https://wn.com/Dreams_And_Rapid_Eye_Movement_BBC_World_News_'Global'_12_08_2015
Neuroscience - Sleep Cycle EEG

Neuroscience - Sleep Cycle EEG

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:10
  • Updated: 17 Jul 2016
  • views: 677
videos
In this video, I will draw the EEG waveforms of our patient, Bob, going through the different stages of sleep going chronologically from waking life to deep sleep to dreaming. First, Bob starts the process of going to bed by brushing his teeth. Right now, his eyes are open and he has active mental concentration on his task. His brain is busy, which is reflected by the beta waves of the EEG waveform. Beta waves have the highest frequency (14 – 30 Hz) and the lowest amplitude which represent the organized chaos inside a busy brain. Next, Bob lies down to sleep. He closes his eyes and his brain transitions into the alpha wave pattern. No longer processing visual information, the brain slows down which is reflected by the 9 – 13 Hz alpha waves. Now, Bob has fallen asleep and enters into stage 1 of non-REM sleep. This state of reduced consciousness shows on the EEG as slower theta waves (4 – 8 Hz) and can also be found when undergoing deep meditation. This stage of sleep is only 5% of the total sleep time for adults, and so Bob quickly enters into stage 2 of non-REM. This stage looks similar to stage 1, but is characterized by sleep spindles and K complexes. Sleep spindles are bursts of rapid, rhythmic activity, and K complexes are brief large spikes of activity. Sleep talking and teeth grinding happen in this stage which is also the plurality of sleep time at 45% of the total. Next, Bob enters stage 3 of non-REM, about 25% of total sleep time. This stage is reflected on the EEG as Delta waves which have the lowest frequency (below 4 Hz) and the highest amplitude. This is the deepest stage of sleep where Bob loses all bodily awareness. Unfortunately for some patients, this is also when sleep walking, night terrors, and bed wetting can occur. Finally, Bob completes a sleep cycle by entering into the most fun stage of sleep – Rapid Eye Movement, or REM sleep. This stage has sawtooth-like, low voltage, high frequency waves that most closely resemble beta waves. There is a loss of motor tone throughout the body except in the extra-ocular eye muscles hence the “rapid eye movements.” This stage is when vivid dreaming occurs, usually lost to memory upon waking. It is thought that REM sleep also facilitates memory processing, to reinforce long-term memories. Two things to take away from this video. First, notice how the higher frequency waves correspond with more intense brain activity. Second, know how to draw the 6 EEG waveforms in order by using the mnemonic “At night, BATS Drink Blood” This concludes our video on Bob’s first sleep cycle. Be sure to like and subscribe for more videos!
https://wn.com/Neuroscience_Sleep_Cycle_Eeg
Rapid Eye Movement (REM) in Cats

Rapid Eye Movement (REM) in Cats

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:30
  • Updated: 02 Nov 2016
  • views: 46
videos
What do cats dream about??!!!! It is very likely that they are reliving an experience they had in their wild imagination - dream. Cats do dream. There is scientific evidence that cat's brain can formulate dreams during sleep. In humans, there are 5 stages of sleep where the fifth stage, AKA REM (rapid eye movement) is where dreams occur.Oct 14, 2009
https://wn.com/Rapid_Eye_Movement_(Rem)_In_Cats
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